Author Archives: wonderingpilgrim

The Adventure of the Four-Gospel Pathways: Quadratos

Quadratos Poster

Combined Pentecost Service

Just a reminder that this Sunday (24th May) is our

Combined Pentecost service

at

St Paul’s Anglican Church
Brompton Road
City Beach

 9.00 am

You are invited to wear something red
and
bring something to share for morning tea

Stations of the Resurrection #4: Feed My Sheep

John 21: 1 – 19

He took Thomas from doubt to faith…
… and Peter from faith to action.

Picture1

Visit James C. Somerville reflection (Click here)

Stations of the Resurrection #3:

STATIONS OF THE RESURRECTION

  1. Jesus eats with disciples and explains the Scriptures

Jesus & disciples eatingLuke 24:36b-48

The risen Christ made himself known to two grieving disciples after he had walked with them on the road to Emmaus and they had offered hospitality. Some days later he eats and teaches with the  larger group of disciples.

Luke’s resurrection accounts are completely antithetical to the Jewish hope in those days for a great, dramatic, and mighty warrior Messiah who would suddenly come and – in one climactic moment – rescue them from all of their travails, smash their oppressors beneath his heel, and raise the Jews up forever and ever. In a sense, this gospel is a corrective for unrealistic expectations. Both appearances are very simple scenes where everything occurred in rhythms of ordinary life –  at the normal pace of walking, eating, and talking. Jesus always appeared in human flesh, and he emphasised that fact. And yet, everything that happened was divine, extraordinary, and imbued with genuine complexity. Luke is instructing the Christians to expect the unexpected, but to watch fir it within their normal lives. Additionally, in both accounts Jesus appeared to more than one person, clearly suggesting that the Christian followers search for their experience of resurrection –  the living reign of God – in community.

– Alexander Shaia, Heart and Mind, p 320

For further reflection:

  1. Where might you recognise the presence of
    Mystery in your day to day living and
    relationships?
  2. Do I have the patience to wait for a maturing of heart and mind before speaking with others and meeting them at their place on life’s journey rather than where we think they should be?
  3. Let us ask for the grace of freedom, respect and safety for others as the risen Christ travels with us.

Stations of the Resurrection 2: Thomas

2: Thomas meets the Risen Christ

John 20:19-31

ThomasJesus invites each one of us, through Thomas,
to touch not only his wounds,
but those wounds in others and in ourselves,
wounds that can make us hate others and ourselves
and can be a sign of separation and division.
These wounds will be transformed into a sign of forgiveness
through the love of Jesus
and will bring people together in love.
These wounds reveal that we need each other.
These wounds become the place of mutual compassion,
of indwelling
and of thanksgiving.

We, too, will show our wounds
when we are with him in the kingdom,
revealing our brokenness
and the healing power of Jesus.

– Jean Vanier
Drawn into the Mystery of Jesus through the Gospel of John

For further reflection:

Jesus empowers his followers to “loose and bind” each others faults and wounds.
How does this contribute to our union with God and one another?
What do I need to “loose or bind”  within myself or those around me?

Stations of the Resurrection

As familiar as many are with the Stations of the Cross, the Stations of the Resurrection are an extension of the story. Here at Wembley Downs we are introducing these Easter points of reflection for the whole Easter season through to Ascension Day and Pentecost, adding a new station each week. They will be placed throughout the church buildings.

Station 1: The Young Man in the Tomb (Mark 16:1-8)

WP_003057A diminutive portrayal of the three women of Mark’s Gospel account as they meet the young man dressed in white at the empty tomb. The small size of the frame against the white drape illustrates Mark’s uniquely understated account of the event. The women flee, saying nothing to anyone, because they are afraid. So ends Mark’s gospel.

What an anticlimax!

 

Yet the women were told that Jesus had risen and had gone ahead of them to Galilee (in Mark’s Gospel, the territory of stormy chaos and dangerous threat). There they would see him!

Is this a hint that the presence of the Christ is to be found in life’s unpredictability and confusion?

What is your Galilee?

A story worth pondering can be found here.

 

 

Easter Services

GOOD FRIDAY

9:30am
A Tale of Two Crosses
– the one borne by Jesus, and the one he summons followers to carry daily

EASTER SUNDAY

9:30am
Worship and Communion
– Stations of the Resurrection